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Teachers' strike in the Netherlands will definitely go ahead

Teachers' strike in the Netherlands will definitely go ahead

Teachers' strike in the Netherlands will definitely go ahead

The teachers’ strike set for November 6 will definitely go ahead as the government has failed to meet the education union’s ultimatum.

Financial demands not met

The government had until October 21 to respond to the request by both employers and unions for 423,5 million euros in 2020 to increase salaries, reduce workloads and deal with the teacher shortage. The government has not agreed to this request, and therefore the planned strike on November 6 will go ahead.

Last week, General Education Union (AOb) revealed that discussions with Prime Minister Rutte had not led to anything, making the strike almost certain. According to the AOb, more than 800 schools from 36 school boards will participate in the strike.

Unlike the previous strike on March 15, teachers won’t be gathering at Malieveld in The Hague, instead, they will be making their message clear on social media. Additionally, a number of regional events are being organised by the unions and those striking are urged to watch the debate on the education budget in the lower house of Dutch parliament.

So, will any teachers be working?

It is up to teachers themselves whether they strike or not. It is, therefore, possible that some teachers will be working the day of the strike whilst others are not present. Those that do turn up to work may suddenly find themselves running all the classes though, as officially, schools are not allowed to replace those striking with substitute teachers. Only colleagues are allowed to take on the classes.

Mina Solanki

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Mina Solanki

Completed her Master's degree at the University of Groningen and worked as a translator before joining IamExpat. She loves to read and has a particular interest in Greek mythology. In...

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Linda Hather 07:33 | 29 October 2019

It is amazing that classes fall out and become free periods, when teachers are sick. There seems to be no backup.