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Dutch petrol prices continue to rise, reach 2 euro mark

Dutch petrol prices continue to rise, reach 2 euro mark

Dutch petrol prices continue to rise, reach 2 euro mark

It isn’t particularly surprising for any drivers in the Netherlands, but that doesn’t make it any less painful; Dutch petrol prices have been rising steadily for years, but last week they reached a new high, as the recommended retail price hit 2 euros per litre for the first time. 

Dutch petrol prices reach 2 euro mark

Earlier this year, a handful of petrol stations in the Netherlands were caught selling petrol at 2 euros a litre for the first time, but since then prices had dropped slightly, remaining below the crucial 2 euro mark. 

This relief was seemingly short-lived, as data from consumer collective UnitedConsumers has revealed that last weekend, the average suggested retail price for a litre of E10 (Euro95) petrol was 2,012 euros. Meanwhile, the prices of LPG and diesel have also reached record highs, at 1,032 and 1,667 euros a litre respectively. 

Rising petrol prices in the Netherlands

Since then, prices have continued to rise; by Wednesday, the average price had risen to 2,03 euros, and prices could continue to climb. According to VNPI, the Dutch petrol industry association, the rising prices can be attributed to two things: Dutch taxes, and the price of oil. 

Oil prices are rising as the economy gradually recovers from the coronavirus pandemic, but also as a result of the current gas shortage in Europe which is seeing energy prices rise at an alarming rate across the continent. Oil is therefore seen as a more affordable and reliable alternative. 

Petrol prices could, therefore, continue to rise, but UnitedConsumers’ Paul van Sels says it’s unlikely that the Netherlands will see it reach 3 euros a litre in the (near) future. He does, however, suggest that the Dutch government may have to cut taxes if prices continue to climb.

Victoria Séveno

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Victoria Séveno

Victoria grew up in Amsterdam, before moving to the UK to study English and Related Literature at the University of York and completing her NCTJ course at the Press Association...

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