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Dutch government introduces 15 cent deposit on small plastic bottles

Dutch government introduces 15 cent deposit on small plastic bottles

Dutch government introduces 15 cent deposit on small plastic bottles

Earlier this year, the government announced a 15 cent deposit for cans in the Netherlands would come into effect in 2022. But before that happens, a 15 cent deposit will apply to small plastic bottles from July 1, 2021.

15 cent deposit on small bottles from July

The deposit will mean drinks will become 15 cents more expensive, and bottles that fall under the new law will be recognisable by a new deposit logo. The Dutch government hopes that at least 90 percent of all bottles sold will be returned and recycled. No deposit will be charged on bottles that don’t feature this new logo.

Shoppers will be able to claim back their 15 cents at 12.000 supermarkets and petrol stations, and in the future, collection points will also be established at train stations. Catering establishments may also choose to collect bottles, although it will not be mandatory and the ongoing coronavirus crisis means it’s difficult to determine how many businesses will invest in the scheme.

Deposit aims to reduce plastic waste in the Netherlands

Approximately 900 million small plastic bottles and 600 million large plastic bottles are sold in the Netherlands each year. Last spring, Environment Minister Stientje van Veldhoven announced she would introduce a deposit for small plastic bottles in the hopes it would limit littering and reduce the amount of plastic waste.

“The most effective way to combat litter is to prevent people from throwing their waste into the environment at all. A deposit appears to be the right way to do this,” Van Veldhoven explained. Back in February, Van Veldhoven announced a 15-cent deposit for all cans sold in the Netherlands would come into effect at the end of 2022.

Victoria Séveno

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Victoria Séveno

Victoria grew up in Amsterdam, before moving to the UK to study English and Related Literature at the University of York and completing her NCTJ course at the Press Association...

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