10 reasons why you are still looking for a job

08 April 2014, by
(4)

When I ask my clients to state what, according to them, is the main reason why they are still unemployed, I hear often two things: the economic crisis and an insufficient level of Dutch.

When we drill down to the core of their job search, however, we discover that there is much more to it than just the poor economic situation and their linguistic skills.

Based on my career coaching experience, I have made a list of top 10 reasons why job seekers are still looking for a job. Take a look and see if you fall into these traps too - and find out how not to.

Not having a job-hunting strategy in place

Huh, a job-hunting strategy? Do I need one? Yes, you do!

Having a job-hunting strategy means that you are crystal clear about what kind of job you are looking for, where you can find it, and the steps that are necessary in order to get the job you want.

Having a strategy means that you are not searching in the dark, but are pursuing your goal with full awareness and control. Only then you can adapt other tools such as your CV and LinkedIn profile so that these support you in your search.

Having a strategy in place enables others (recruiters, friends, colleagues, etc.) to understand what are you looking for and help you find a position.

Not being consistent with your job search

A strategy in itself is not enough; you need to apply it in a consistent way. That means that every day, week, fortnight, etc., you repeat the same steps, over and over again.

Only then does your strategy have a chance of working. If you have only tried once or twice to arrange an introduction interview and it didn’t work, that’s just normal. You need to do it many, many times.

First of all, that increases the probability of arranging one, and secondly, you get better at it through practice, therefore increasing again your chances of getting invited.

Not customising your CV & cover letter applying

Many of my clients have one standard CV that they use to apply for different jobs. Often they will customise the cover letter, but leave the CV untouched. What a pity!

Often recruiters will look first at your CV and then read the cover letter, so you need to grab their attention immediately. What you want to show via your CV is that you are THE candidate for the job.

When you send a standard CV, you leave room for interpretation by someone who might not always have the time or the desire to make the effort to imagine how you would fit.

Not having an appealing, clear and complete LinkedIn profile

I have already written about the importance of LinkedIn in the job search, but I cannot stress it often enough. Your online presence is very important to your job-hunting success.

Make sure that your profile is complete, your photo professional and your summary appealing. You will then move higher in the LinkedIn search results and contribute positively to your online brand. Yes, when you are looking for a job, you are your own brand, your own best product that you want to sell.

Not networking online

Once you have a great LinkedIn profile, you need to go out there and show it to the world so that people will start noticing you. The best way is to join groups on LinkedIn and contribute to the discussions. You can also start your own discussions.

Not networking face-to-face on a regular basis

I know this can be a tough one, especially for expats who have just arrived. I have experienced that myself when I was starting my own business.

reasons still looking job

I know, however, from my experience and from my clients who got a new job via networking that there is nothing like personal contact. It is said that people first need to know you, like you, trust you, then they will buy from you or, in job-hunting terms, hire you.

So go to different networking gatherings and FOLLOW UP! Schedule meetings, coffees, lunches, etc. It works!

Not spending enough time on your job search

When asked how much time they spend searching for a job, many of my clients say on average one to two hours per day. Sometimes only a couple of hours per week!

If you are already employed and looking for a new job, then this might be understandable, but if you don’t have one yet, it should be your full-time job to get one. You need to spend five to six hours a day on your job search.

Spending too much time behind a computer

Also, you need to be spending your time in an effective way, and sitting behind a computer is NOT the most effective way. If may be safe, but you need to be close to the fire, not far away from it.

This ties into my point 6 regarding networking. You need to get out. Think of scheduling interviews with hiring managers, head hunters, etc. Even going out to a social event, unrelated to your job search, and talking about your situation can be much more effective than sitting behind your computer. Ask other people for help so that they can support you in your job search.

Not being able to "sell" yourself during an interview

Once you finally get an interview, you might be so stressed and worried that you don’t present your best side. My best advice is to prepare yourself really well for an interview.

Ask a friend to role-play it with you. Be confident and aware of your strengths. Interviewing is like dating: if the recruiter sees you are desperate, he or she will subconsciously think you are less attractive than the other candidate, who may be less strong based on other factors, but more confident in her- or himself.

Not having a positive mindset

Positive attitude is everything. Looking for a job can be a very demotivating and frustrating process in itself. I know that, from when I was looking for a job at the beginning of my career. Maybe you have been looking for a job for a long time now and are feeling frustrated and depressed.

This is when you need to remember that this will not last forever; eventually you will get a job. Having a positive mindset helps you along the way. It assists you to regain your courage and energy after negative response and keep going.

The best way to maintain a positive frame of mind is to formulate an empowering sentence that you repeat to yourself couple of times a day like a mantra.

It can be: "I will get a job! I am learning from these experiences. I am the best marketing manager, accountant, project manager, etc." My mantra that helps me to grow my business is: "Never give up!"

Good luck! And give me a shout if you need help with any of the above.

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Comments arranged by date (Total 4 comments)  
robvanz
April 08 2014, 11:05AM

Good article, Dorota! Hope that many people will feel inspired by it and act accordingly.

C
DoSoCoach
April 08 2014, 11:12AM

Thanks Rob! Any points to add from your side?

robvanz
April 08 2014, 11:42AM

When the job-hunting strategy is in place, job seekers can actively target the companies they would like to work for by researching the people (hiring managers) that are responsible for the type of jobs they are looking for (e.g. a finance director if you are looking for a job as controller, a marketing manager if you are looking for a marketing position etc.) and then reach out to them by offering help or by sending them something that could be of interest to them and/or that company. That is a more direct and proactive way of building your contacts and bypasses recruiters rather than only responding to vacancy announcements. Not all vacancies are being published and someone's network is a very important channel (if not the most important channel) for job-hunting. Finding a (new) job is a job in itself. It is about marketing a product that is called "I, job seeker".

C
DoSoCoach
April 08 2014, 05:29PM

Great point Rob!

 
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About the Author
C
Dorota Klop-Sowinska

I specialize in international career and expat coaching. I am a certified coach / counselor at Dutch...

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